Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Guest Blogging Elsewhere: One Late Bloomer Finds Her Season



I was away on holiday when my latest Guest Post over at InScribe Writers Online was published. Now that I'm back and online again, I wanted to make the post available to you. Our writing prompt was to describe the season in which we find ourselves, both in life and our writing. I've had fun exploring the topic because I've considered myself a late bloomer on several fronts.

I used to think being a late bloomer was a negative thing, but I've come to see it in a different light. Often, we think of being 'late' as doing something after the expected, proper, or usual time. 'You're late, behind schedule, you missed it'. That's true, of course. But, think of flowers in a garden, those plants that blossom later in the season, we don't think of them as 'late', do we? We like early bloomers, mid-summer bloomers, and we're always glad for flowers that carry the season into autumn. Certainly they are late blooming, but they are not late, as in being behind schedule. In the plant scheme of things, they are right on time. They've just taken their own time to come into bloom. 

That idea changes everything, wouldn't you say? And it's most encouraging for those of us who have come into certain aspects of life later on, not in the usual time frame. Thank goodness for late bloomers in the beautiful garden of life. I think Susan Branch would see herself as a later in life bloomer. She mentions somewhere in her Isle of Dreams book that she used to encourage herself, as she edged towards turning forty and wondered what to do with her life, that Julia Child's first book came out when she was 51; Beatrix Potter married for the first time at age 49; and Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote her first Little House book at age 65. Susan says, "Everyone had to grow into themselves before they could offer anything. ... And they all left behind the gifts they'd made of their lives."

That's how I feel. I find her comment so, so encouraging. Now, I do hope you'll come and say hello on my guest post One Late Bloomer Finds Her Season. If you're blooming later than usual, maybe you'll find it a joy to discover you're not alone. There's many more of us on this fine journey than first suspected.

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PS. I'll be back here on Friday to share some photos and stories of our recent visit to Oahu, Hawaii.


Wishing you a beautiful day.

Hugs,
Brenda
xox


20 comments:

  1. I just finished reading your guest post.WOW! That is wonderful stuff. I am not a write and up until recently, now past 70 years of age, did I consider myself a leader.Now at this age, I am starting a Widows Ministry and I will be leading.Talk of a late bloomer.

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    1. I'm so pleased for you, Ruth. I'm glad that something good can come from what must have been a difficult time for you. Blessings on you!!

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  2. I'm a late bloomer too so I can totally relate! Now I'm off to read you guest post.

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    1. Now we can relax and enjoy the seasons. Thanks Margie for your encouraging words here and on my other post.

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  3. I wonder what constitutes a late bloomer? I did a lot of things when I was young, but decided to go back to university and finished a French degree in my 50s. So as far as that goes, I'm a late bloomer. I think we all change throughout life, or many of us do, and we gain confidence and opportunities to do things that we would have never imagined in our youth.
    I loved this post of yours!

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    1. Now that's a good question, Lorrie. Maybe it's really a non-starter (?) Every season we live our lives going about what's needful in the time. We grew, we tried new things, we explored, we read and learned things, we lived. And oh yes, to your comment about gaining confidence to do things we wouldn't have imagined in our youth.

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  4. Brenda, you are in very good company with the likes of Beatrix Potter, Laura Ingalls Wilder, and others. Rudabekias are beautiful and worth waiting for! The fact that we have spring blooms, mid-summer blooms, and late bloomers makes for a well rounded garden which we get to enjoy much longer than a bed filled with tulips. I enjoyed your post very much; both this one and your guest post.

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    1. Sandi, like you, as much as I love tulips and all the spring bloomers, I'm also very grateful for all the later bloomers. It would be an empty garden otherwise, in our front yards and our lives. It was Grandma Moses who became my first inspiration many years ago (in my 40s and 50s) when I read that she first started painting in earnest at the age of 78. According to Wikipedia, she is often cited as an example of an individual who successfully began a career in the arts at an advanced age. And yes, we are in very good company with such fine examples for us from which to take courage. xox

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  5. Brenda, I love this post and your words are beautifully written and so very true. I am always happy, as well as grateful to read your lovely words. They are always inspiring.

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    1. You are such a lovely encourager, Sandra. Thank you so much!! xox

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  6. I agree with your thoughts on being a late bloomer. I love the Laura Ingalls Wilder quote about growing into oneself. It's so true!

    I'm going to go read your other post!

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    1. I'm sorry, I wasn't clear enough, that saying actually was from Susan Branch about Laura, not Laura herself.

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  7. Brenda - wonderful thought on being a "late bloomer" - since I am 62 and will be turning 63 soon I needed to read these encouraging words. Thank you for sharing. Looking forward to photos of Hawaii. Hugs!

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    1. Thank you Debbie. I see we're both of a similar age. I'm working away on the blog post today. So hopefully it will be up tomorrow.

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  8. This is beautiful. I have never really thought about how nice it is to see the different seasons of flowers blooming. I love the contrast you made to how people do this and it is just as lovely. Thank you!

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    1. I'm so glad you stopped by and left a wee comment here. Much appreciated. Heading to visit your blog now.

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  9. Brendam you are such an encourager. I feel as though I am a late bloomer, in that I realise I am now capable of far more than I ever expected to be. Some of the best flowers come in the Autumn, and how they are appreciated once the early bloomers have finished.
    Lovely post.

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  10. Hi Brenda. Have you been to Debra Eve's Later Bloomer blog? https://laterbloomer.com/late-bloomers/ She writes about the women you mention. Sue Shanahan writes about Susan Branch: https://commonplacegrace.com/2017/03/01/plp-2-susan-branch/

    I'm a late bloomer when it comes to writing as well, but lately the muse has seemed to have left me which leaves me wondering what's next! I love your analogy in your guest post using the Black-eyed Susan, as I have them in my garden. It is my State's flower so prevalent here in Maryland. Perhaps I will be inspired by them as I see them in a different light now and help me find what's next.

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  11. Haven't read your post yet (I will after I comment), but I have never considered the idea of being a late-bloomer. That sounds about right for myself. Interesting thoughts are starting to arise.

    Now off to your post! :)

    -Merry

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To My Beautiful Readers,

Some people come into our lives, leave footprints on our hearts, and we are never the same. ~ Franz Peter Schubert

Thank you so much for leaving your 'footprint' here in my comment box. I do appreciate you taking a moment to share your thoughts today.

Brenda xox

PS. I do not always comment here, but I do look forward to coming and visiting you....