Thursday, March 26, 2009

Culinaria Greece



A friend lent us her copy of Culinaria Greece, a wonderful book about Greek cuisine and culture. It's been quite the culinary voyage as we sigh and, oops, drool over richly coloured photos and tempting recipes.

One recipe that captured my appetite is a potato dish. Along with the recipe, here's an interesting -- and amusing -- bit of historical information about the introduction of potatoes to the area.

The editor, Marianthi Milona, says that potatoes are now "an essential part of Greek cuisine and are just as popular an appetizer as they are a main dish, whether fried, baked, or boiled.

However, when this 'new-fangled' food was first introduced about 150 years ago, it caused such controversy that...the first government chef of the young Greek state allegedly had to resort to a cunning ploy to get his extremely suspicious countrymen to accept this unknown food. Thus, instead of handing potatoes out freely, as he had intended, he ordered his soldiers to appear to guard them. This immediately aroused the curiosity of the farmers, who promptly stole them!"

So guess what? We're having Patates Lemonates, or otherwise known as Lemon Potatoes, for dinner tonight. They are a version of oven-baked fries and scalloped -- two pounds of potatoes cut into fingers, seasoned with salt and oregano, sprinkled with Greek extra virgin olive oil and the juice of two lemons, plus enough water to just cover them -- all baked in an oven-proof dish at 400 F until all golden brown, at which point you turn off the oven and leave in for a few extra minutes.

On this sort of spring, sort of wintry day in Alberta, here's to thoughts of warm summer evenings, the sounds of gentle lapping waves, and the seductive aromas of Greek cooking.


Pou ine i paralia?

Not up on your Greek?
Translated, it apparently means "Where is the beach?"


Happy Day,
Brenda







10 comments:

  1. Mmmm. I LOVE Greek lemon potatoes -- I just served them myself on Tuesday evening! I'll have to try this recipe. On this cold spring (?) day I agree ... where's the beach?

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  2. That sounds absolutely delicious and I love the history lesson!!

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  3. Janny, is that you?

    Staci, We're still waiting for them too finish baking, but they smell wondrous!

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  4. wow always something new when you
    are on e-mails, such interesting
    stories and now I will have to try
    these Greek lemon potatoes. Wonder if my honey will like them???

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  5. Well, dear friends, the lemon potatoes were wonderful. It took a long time to bake though, about 2 1/2 hours at 400 F. So start early.

    Rosalie, it probably depends if your honey likes oregano or not, if he'll like this recipe. I'll bring you some next time I see you. Jean gave me some actual Greek oregano. It does taste different than some.

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  6. We like potatoes too so I shall be giving this recipe a try. Sounds delicious - thanks for the thought. A x

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  7. I am a potato lover through and through. I've never heard of lemon potatoes but they sound good. Were they?

    LeAnne

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  8. For those of you interested in the recipe, yes it was great! I'd never heard of doing lemon with potatoes but they were wonderful.

    We did find that it took a long time to finish baking (we think we added just a little too much water, so it took a while for it to cook away), so make sure it really is a scant covering over the potatoes.

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To My Beautiful Readers,

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Thank you so much for leaving your 'footprint' here in my comment box. I do appreciate you taking a moment to share your thoughts today.

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